Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Street Smart Leadership


 
In a poll conducted by TIME, The Value of Higher Education, varies, depending on who answers the question: “What is the most important reason people should go to college (Ripley, 2012, p. 40)?” The general population responses are as follows:  40%, to gain skills and knowledge for a career; 17%, to gain a well-rounded general education; 14%, to increase one’s earning power; 6%, to become an informed citizen in a global society; 12%, to learn to think critically; and 11%, to formulate goals and values for life. On the other hand, college leaders suggest the following:  21%, to gain skills and knowledge for a career; 14%, to gain a well-rounded general education; 2%, to increase one’s earning power; 19%, to become an informed citizen in a global society; 38%, to learn to think critically; and 8%, to formulate goals and values for life. Regardless of the differences between these two groups, it pays to get some form of education after graduating high school. One of major ‘buzz’ statements that are being thrown around today is that going to school DOESN’T pay. However, according to Ripley, on average, people with a bachelor degree will earn more than 77% more than those with a high school diploma in their lifetime. Depending on the amount of money one expects to make, education pays in a multitude of ways. Even more so, the application of education pays. No one said you had to give up your street smarts and common sense when you obtain higher level of education. There isn’t a referee on the side of the stage during graduation that says that people are to through away everything they have learned before entering college. There is such thing called BALANCE. If a person has a degree or not, there are multiple ways of making a living, being a leader in the community and being a responsible productive citizen.

Ripley, A. (2012, October 18). College is dead. Long live college! Time, 180(18), 33-43.

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